Friday, September 01, 2006

Friday Nudibranch Blogging


Ceratosoma sinuata "can change the shape of her body as she pleases, giving extraordinary appearances to her size: sometimes she will dwindle to a small, thing, shriveled object, at other times she will swell to huge proportions. At one minute she will be tall enough to reach the sky, then contract to dwarfish dimensions.

"She is believed to be able to bring down the heavens, hang up the earth, solidify springs of water, melt mountains, lift ships into the air, bring low the gods, put out the stars, and light up the underworld."

(Photo by Jun Imamoto.)

7 comments:

ntodd said...

Friday Nudibranch Blogging is up and running, so come pay your respects to Ceratosoma sinuata, or else.

You damned veggies are so fucking bossy. I'm beginning to suspect you want to kill all omnivores and replace them with nudibranches.

Snow said...

She is believed to be able to bring down the heavens, hang up the earth, solidify springs of water, melt mountains, lift ships into the air, bring low the gods, put out the stars, and light up the underworld.

Sounds like a busy girl.

Buckeye, Dealer of Rare Coins said...

I now have Billy Joel's Always a Woman going through my head. For this, you must die.

Silleigh said...

She appears to have ich on her... fin... and her... ears... um, whatever those parts are.

But still, another breathtaking nudie posted by Phila!

Phila said...

You damned veggies are so fucking bossy. I'm beginning to suspect you want to kill all omnivores and replace them with nudibranches.

Not only that, but I'll grind your bones to make my bread.

I now have Billy Joel's Always a Woman going through my head. For this, you must die.

Save your complaints for NTodd...he's the one Billy Joel wrote that song about.

four legs good said...

He would look delightful in my newly painted bathroom.

res ipsa loquitur said...

Look, Phil. Nudibranches may be "sexual cannibals:"

Sexual cannibalism has fascinated biologists ever since Darwin. It is not limited to mantises, but is also found in other invertebrates, including spiders, midges and perhaps horned nudibranchs.